Todd Fratzel is the Editor of Tool Box Buzz and the President of Front Steps Media, LLC, a web based media company focused on the Home Improvement and Construction Industry.He is also the Principal Engineer for United Construction Corp., located in Newport, NH. In his capacity at United he oversees the Residential and Commercial Building Division along with all Design-Build projects.He is also the editor of Home Construction & Improvement.
I have read dozens of reviews for Dewalt,Bosch,Baileigh,Grizzly and others and from my perspective (regarding Dewalt at least), Black&dDecker/Stanley have turned the product line , for the most part into junk. I have read reviews that indicate outright, that the table is not level, the fence is warped and if you want accurate cuts, then possibly you should look elsewhere.
The DeWalt doesn’t go above and beyond here but has some standard safety equipment as part of its Site-Pro Guarding System. The Blade Guard Assembly is a standard clear plastic set of guards that allows the wood to be fed to the blade but shields you from putting hands on the exposed blade in a slip. The guards will lock in a raised position when you need to see the blade—for example, when adjusting the blade height—which lessens the temptation to remove this safety feature when it’s in your way.
The power switch is a bit finicky.  I noticed this at their media event and also when using the saw.  A quick press of the on button does not work and it seems that you have to press the button for a few seconds.  Additionally, you need to push this button straight on and not at an angle to work.  My guess is That Dewalt will work this out in time.
Chris – Great question. If you break it down a bit you can see why. The table saw uses a much smaller blade so the demand on that saw is actually quite a bit less. Also, if you make the table saw 120, you need another battery, and the conversion cable….the saw becomes VERY expensive. Just my two cents…but I’m fairly sure this is what kept it at 60v….it’s damn impressive though.

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Prior to deploying the power loss reset feature there had been many job site horror stories of unattended table saws starting up upon power restoration.  Sometimes this restart caused material damage or personal injury.   This usually happened when the saw operator did not think to turn off the tool before walking away to go restore power. In the meantime, other people have leaned on, temporarily placed tools or even building materials on the saw, a blade spinning disaster waiting to happen.
Smaller, portable table saw models have direct-drive motors that can operate on 120 V power to produce 2 HP. This is enough motor power to take on thinner materials. Table saws with more powerful motors are usually stationary saws that produce between 3 to 5 HP. Table saws with stronger motors rely on a belt drive to transfer the power from the motor to the blade and these operate on 240 V.

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